Gigantes: Greek Giant Baked Beans

Veganopoulous Gigantes Greek Giant Baked Beans

I’m really pleased to share another of my family’s recipes with you, this time my mum’s awesome Greek giant baked beans. Known as Gigantes or Yigantes, this is a perfect autumn-winter dish and pretty simple to make. The word ‘gigantes’ in Greek means giant, and if you’ve seen these on a menu listed as Gigantes Plaki, the ‘plaki’ refers to a dish being cooked in a tomato based sauce.

Veganopoulous Gigantes Greek Giant Baked Beans

Everyone makes this differently and as always, you can add a little of this or that. My mum doesn’t use garlic in her recipe and I think they’re fine without it but if you want to add some when sauteeing the veggies, go ahead! If you don’t like dill, you can add a little fresh parsley instead. If you want to make this an oil free dish, that’s fine too– you can just do the sautee step in a little broth or water.

Some recipes in cookbooks and online include the addition of sugar. I personally don’t think it’s needed and when I’ve tried the tinned ready made gigantes, they’re always a bit too sweet for me.

The cooking process is pretty straightforward and I’ve put together this little step by step photo illustration to tie in with the instructions further down:

Veganopoulous Gigantes Greek Giant Baked Beans

If you want to soak your giant beans overnight, go ahead. Mum says she never bothers and when she has soaked the beans, it makes no difference to the finished meal. Not soaking may mean your stove top cooking takes a bit longer.

The gigantes shown in my photos here are quite thick without a heap of sauce. We kinda forgot to take the beans out of the oven earlier so there’s not as much liquid butttt this isn’t necessarily a problem because I love them this way too! If you like slightly more soupy, you can reduce the cooking time. Veganopoulous Gigantes Greek Giant Baked Beans

Simple, delicious and nutritious! These beans are great on toast too  🙂

Veganopoulous Gigantes Greek Giant Baked Beans

Gigantes: Greek Giant Baked Beans
Print Recipe
Perfect for autumn and winter, this classic Greek dish is both easy to make and delicious. No need for the tinned versions or waiting for your next trip to a Greek restaurant!
Servings Prep Time
8 serves 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 minutes in the oven 30-40 on stove
Servings Prep Time
8 serves 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 minutes in the oven 30-40 on stove
Gigantes: Greek Giant Baked Beans
Print Recipe
Perfect for autumn and winter, this classic Greek dish is both easy to make and delicious. No need for the tinned versions or waiting for your next trip to a Greek restaurant!
Servings Prep Time
8 serves 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 minutes in the oven 30-40 on stove
Servings Prep Time
8 serves 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45 minutes in the oven 30-40 on stove
Ingredients
Servings: serves
Instructions
  1. Optional step: Soak your beans overnight if you prefer. Make sure the beans are well covered in water. Drain and rinse the beans.
  2. Put the beans in a large pot and fill the pot with water until the water is about one and half inches above the beans. Bring to a boil then simmer until the beans are tender, about 30-40 minutes. Test three beans by gently squeezing them. If you've soaked your beans beforehand, check around the 20 minute mark onwards. The beans should not feel mushy. Drain the beans in to a colander and let them sit while you prepare the veggies.
  3. Preheat your oven to 180C (or the 'moderate' setting).
  4. In the same pot, heat the 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Sautee the carrots, onion and celery until tender on a medium heat.
  5. Add the drained beans to the veggie mixture in the pot. Sprinkle over the paprika and stir gently.
  6. Put the 500ml of passata in a large jug and add enough water to make one litre. Stir the tomato-water mixture and mix it in with the beans and veggies.
  7. Add another litre of water to the beans and veg and stir gently. Add in the salt, chopped dill and optional 2 tablespoons of olive oil. It will look like a very runny watery soup-- don't despair!
  8. Mix everything well then pour in to a large baking dish or casserole dish. Add pepper to taste if you like or more salt. Cover the dish tightly with foil and cook for about 40 minutes, checking at the half hour mark.
  9. Remove the foil and cook for another ten minutes. Keep an eye on the level of liquid in the beans. You don't want them to dry out!
  10. Remove from the oven when the beans are to your liking-- either with a fair bit of sauciness or more a thick stew. Keep in mind the mixture thickens more the next day.
  11. Serve the gigantes on their own, or with thick chunks of bread.
Recipe Notes

I've listed 30 to 40 minutes as the passive cooking time-- this is for the beans cooking on the stove before they go in the oven.

If you don't like dill, add in a little chopped flat leaf parsley to your liking.

If you are oil-free, sautee the veggies in some broth or water.

If you want more of a garlic flavour, add a large clove of finely chopped garlic to the pot when you sautee the veggies.

Some people like to pre-cook the beans with a dried bay leaf in the water.

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16 thoughts on “Gigantes: Greek Giant Baked Beans

  1. Looks delicious – I love baked beans of any sort. I am surprised they have dill as I don’t associate it with Greek cooking (not that I am an expert) but would be interested to try it!. And I love the sauce quite thick like in your photos.

    • it’s funny because my family never used dill but my mum’s brother in law, who comes from another region of Greece, has always used dill. The first time he made us a spanakopita it had dill and we were really surprised (I love dill so it worked for me). We never had coriander either but my grandmother once told me she was familiar with it, some people she knows uses it and that really surprised me too as I don’t ever see coriander in the Greek cooking I’m more familiar with! I think it must be a regional thing too, I always thought you only ever use red wine for Italian pasta sauces but there was a Jamie Oliver Italy episode where I think he expressed surprise when some women in Italy told him they only use white wine in their ragu– that was news to me too!

      • I always associate spanakopita with having tons of dill, and that being the main reason I liked it so much, interesting it might be more of a regional thing. Thanks so much for posting this recipe! Now I’ve just gotta track down some giant beans!

        • now I only like my spanakopita with dill! My grandmothers were from the northern part of Greece so I have to see if dill is commonly used there.

  2. When I open your blog page, the pictures are so big – that it feels like that I have the pate in front of me and could easily dive in with fork or spoon! Nom nom nom. Utterly gorgeous! I do love butter beans and so want to make Gigantes Greek giant beans, but wait as I cannot find giant butter beans 🙁 may have to give in and make them with traditional butter beans for the sake of greed!

  3. I’m on a bean phase at the moment. These sound delicious and perfect for winter. I can’t imagine any leftovers lasting too long at my house! 🙂

    • I tried to think of creative things to do with the leftovers but really they’re best on their own or with good bread for baked beans on toast 😀

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