10

Vegan Oil Free Chocolate Malt Cake

vegan oil free chocolate malt cake

Malt is one of those flavours I have always loved from childhood but alas, two of my favourite malt products contain dairy which rules them out for me. I’d love a vegan version of Milo, a popular malted milk powder in Australia.

Johanna from Green Gourmet Giraffe is hosting this month’s We Should Cocoa challenge which is run by Choclette of Tin and Thyme. Johanna’s chosen theme is malt. I’ve used the syrupy malt extract before but this time I wanted malt powder. Unfortunately it doesn’t appear to be sold in any supermarket, bulk food or health type stores but I did end up finding the powdered form in the online shops of home beer brewing suppliers. Bad news was that the malt powder I wanted was either out of stock or the shipping was more than the product itself. So I stuck with the liquid version of malt extract.

First I made a malted chocolate banana smoothie, though I went a bit too easy on the chocolate. This smoothie was made with oat milk, banana, cacao powder and a heaped teaspoon of malt. I could barely taste the malt and wonder if the powder form would be more obvious (and I clearly could do with a little more cacao! And a garden rake):

malt cacao smoothie

And then we had our yearly problem where our upright freezer iced up so badly we had to take everything out to defrost it. I found a packet of pear sauce I’d made so my mind turned to chocolate cake made with pear sauce instead of using oil or a vegan butter. When I make cakes or cake-like loaves more for snacks, I prefer to make them oil free or at least quite low in fat.

This cake was a mish mash kindof experiment where I crossed my fingers and hoped it would all turn out okay and surprisingly, it did. This worked well for the kids to have as a snack (and my kids have that radar thing where as soon as I sit down with a cup of tea they come up asking for food). The malt flavour is quite strong and the kitchen smelled pretty good.

It’s a simple cake, nothing mind blowing, but it was nice to have something that was both chocolatey and malty. Next time though, I’d love to try the powdered malt extract. I used coconut sugar as that’s what I had on hand, but brown sugar would work too. Any sugar really!

And here’s my favourite malt-like thing of all, our cat Maltesers. This week marks two years since Maltesers and his brother Punky came to live with us via Melbourne Animal Rescue. Both kids got to choose a name each, one was in to watching Punky Brewster at the time, the other chose the name of his favourite chocolate (and I wish Maltesers were vegan because I loved those too). It’s really funny how they really seem to match their names. I mean sure, if we’d chosen other names they’d match those too, but you know what I mean.

lazy cat on a hot day

Vegan Oil Free Chocolate Malt Cake
Print Recipe
This chocolatey malt cake is made oil free and lower in fat by using pear puree in place of oil or dairy free butter.
Servings Prep Time
12 pieces 10 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 pieces 10 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Vegan Oil Free Chocolate Malt Cake
Print Recipe
This chocolatey malt cake is made oil free and lower in fat by using pear puree in place of oil or dairy free butter.
Servings Prep Time
12 pieces 10 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 pieces 10 minutes
Cook Time
45 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: pieces
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to a moderate temp (about 180C). Prepare your preferred cake tin, I used a bundt style tin.
  2. In a blender (or whisked by hand), blend the milk, pear sauce, malt extract and sugar. Sift the dry ingredients in to a bowl then mix in the blended liquids, taking care not to overmix.
  3. Bake for about 45 minutes, checking with a toothpick or skewer. When done, turn on to a cooling rack. Dust with icing sugar if you ah, slightly burn it like I did.
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12

Vegan Black Coconutty Forest Chocolate Ripple Cake

Veganopoulous black forest coconut ripple cake

Happy New Year! Here’s a simple and delicious festive treat you can enjoy any time (that includes breakfast, sssshhh).

Chocolate ripple cake is one of those welcome fixtures at maaaany an Australian party. It’s the easiest cake to make, always delicious and always a favourite. Chef Google tells me the American equivalent is an icebox cake. A chocolate ripple cake is simply getting a packet of plain chocolate biscuits (cookies) and sandwiching them together with whipped cream in (usually) a log shape. Cover the finished log with cream, stick it in the fridge overnight and it’s done. Easy!

Veganopoulous black forest coconut ripple cake

In Australia, we have chocolate ripple biscuits that are, of course, the default biscuit for this cake. In the past I’ve changed it up and used gingernut biscuits and I think you can pretty much use any plain biscuit that is quite a tough cookie (BAM!) and not wafer thin kinda fragile jobbies. Chocolate ripple biscuits happen to be vegan as well.

I had a packet of these biscuits that were gifted to me and had been saving them for a special occasion, but I wanted to do something different for Christmas last week. My Dad likes Black Forest Cake and cherry-coconut kinds of chocolates so I made this Black Forest inspired version with coconut cream. I also wanted to avoid the traditional log shape because I was using cherries, so I used these individual serve trifle glasses instead to make it more a layered chocolate ripple cake.

Veganopoulous black forest coconut ripple cake

This was so easy to make. You just chill a couple cans of full fat coconut cream in the fridge for a day or two and scoop out the more solid cream bits, whip it up with some cacao powder and sweetener of your choice (I used maple syrup) and then layer the biscuits with the cream and some pitted cherries (I used bottled).

I actually toasted some shredded coconut and had chocolate flakes to serve on top but I stupidly forgot all about them when I was taking photos. Gah!

I’ve said four servings in the recipe but they’re large-ish serves so if you have smaller glasses, you could make six. Or you can layer this in a bowl that suits a trifley dessert. Up to you!

 

Black Coconutty Forest Chocolate Ripple Cake
Print Recipe
An easy Black Forest meets Cherry-Coconut biscuit based cake. Be sure to have your cans of coconut cream chilled! Makes four serves, though it can also depend on the size of your serving bowls/glasses or how much cream and biscuits you want!
Servings
4 servings
Servings
4 servings
Black Coconutty Forest Chocolate Ripple Cake
Print Recipe
An easy Black Forest meets Cherry-Coconut biscuit based cake. Be sure to have your cans of coconut cream chilled! Makes four serves, though it can also depend on the size of your serving bowls/glasses or how much cream and biscuits you want!
Servings
4 servings
Servings
4 servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Open your cans of chilled coconut cream. Put the solids in a mixing bowl and keep any remaining liquid in case you need to thin the cream out a little. Add the cacao powder and maple syrup in tablespoons amounts and taste to see if you need to add more-- beat everything with electric beaters then taste. Add the remaining cacao and maple syrup and whip it good. My cream mixture was very thick so I added a tablespoon of the reserved liquid from the can of coconut cream.
  2. Take your serving glasses and put down a thin layer of coconut cream. Press a chocolate biscuit in the middle. Depending on the size of your glasses, you may need to crumble some more biscuit (as I did) and place the crumbs down to make an even layer of biscuits. I also crumbled a second biscuit and layered in on top as I wanted a thick biscuit layer.
  3. Repeat the cream biscuit layer. Now add a layer of the pitted cherries on top of the biscuit layer (so you should have cream-biscuit-cream-biscuit-cherries). Cover the cherry layer with cream.
  4. Cover your glasses and place in the fridge overnight or at least 8 hours. When done, decorate your way! I used fresh cherries and mint leaves (and I forgot the the toasted coconut and chocolate flakes).
Recipe Notes

The thickness or order of your layers may be different to mine, depending on what glasses you're using. Basically you want to have a pretty even layering system going on. Don't worry if you think it looks bad, it will taste fantastic! I thought mine looked blergh and regretted not taking more care but nobody noticed! I even screwed up the layering with one or two of the glasses, try spot the glass with the cherries out of order in the pics...

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