10

Aquafabulous Pecan Tahini Sweet Potato Banana Bread

Aquafabulous Pecan Tahini Sweet Potato Banana Bread by Veganopoulous

This banana bread (with a whopper of a title…sorry) was a bit of an experiment– in other words, I had stuff I needed to use up like aquafaba (the liquid from canned chickpeas), bananas, wholemeal flour and a sweet potato I’d roasted a few days ago. Whenever I have bananas getting overripe, I always go for a banana bread but this time I wanted to just throw stuff in to a bowl and see how it worked out, without following a recipe. Maybe with a touch more fancy in it. Fortunately it didn’t end up being a recipe for disaster and instead I ended up with a banana bread that is really pretty ace.

I did plan on making it with wholemeal spelt flour but urgh, had none in the cupboard. That’s when I spotted some wholemeal flour next to the plain flour. I don’t cook much with wholemeal flour but if I do, it’s usually mixed with another lighter flour. Because I only had plain flour (all purpose) I went with that. In the future I’ll try this with gluten free flours like buckwheat, maybe some millet though my previous gluten free banana bread attempts have been a bit forgettable.

If you’re a lazy cook like me, you might like the use of the blender. Mashing banana by hand always leaves me with a layer of banana at the bottom of a cake no matter how much I mash. Problem solved with the blender!

The inclusion of the roasted sweet potato probably isn’t that necessary (it can be boiled or steamed), or you can add in extra banana instead of the sweet potato. Do roast the pecans beforehand though, it adds a lovely flavour and lets you tick a fancy-cake checkbox.

My tahini is one with a lot of oil on the top, so if you have a drier tahini you may want to consider adding a little oil of your choice if you think the bread will be too dry. I like to avoid adding oil where possible so if I had to use a drier tahini, I probably wouldn’t add any oil but that’s all down to personal preference!

You can play around with the recipe– want a stronger tahini flavour? Add more! Use walnuts instead of pecans. Take half the batter and mix some raw cacao through it to make a chocolate batter, then make a marbled loaf. Add chunks of store bought halva (that’s what I’m doing next). Make a marbled loaf with chunks of halva. Etc etc etc!

Check out the official Aquafaba website, or head over to the Vegan Meringue Hits and Misses Facebook group where people continue to come up with all kinds of amazing stuff. Do that while you’re eating a piece of this bread that’s thickly coated with tahini!

Aquafabulous Pecan Tahini Sweet Potato Banana Bread by Veganopoulous

 

 

 

 

Aquafabulous Pecan Tahini Sweet Potato Banana Bread
Print Recipe
A vegan banana bread using aquafaba that's taken up a notch with the addition of tahini, roast pecans and roast sweet potato. I've listed 10 slices as the serving size but of course that's up to you 😉
Servings Prep Time
10 slices 15 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
10 slices 15 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Aquafabulous Pecan Tahini Sweet Potato Banana Bread
Print Recipe
A vegan banana bread using aquafaba that's taken up a notch with the addition of tahini, roast pecans and roast sweet potato. I've listed 10 slices as the serving size but of course that's up to you 😉
Servings Prep Time
10 slices 15 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
10 slices 15 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: slices
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 180C (moderate oven temperature).
  2. In a bowl, sift together the plain flour, wholemeal flour, baking powder, baking soda, ground cinnamon and salt. Add in the pecans and stir to combine.
  3. In a blender, whiz up the non-dairy milk, unbeaten aquafaba, tahini, bananas, sweet potato and raw sugar. Whiz until the liquid is smooth and free of lumps.
  4. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and give it a good stir but don't overmix.
  5. Pour the batter in to a loaf pan. Mine is a silicon loaf pan that measures 22cm x 12cm (8.5" x 4.75") on the bottom. There was a lot of batter and the loaf pan spread out a bit. If you're using a metal tin, you may want to line the sides with sticking-up baking paper just in case.
  6. Cook in a moderate oven (about 180C) and check at the 45 minute mark, then keep checking. All up mine took about one hour to bake until a skewer came out crumb-free (it had a little moisture which was fine). Leave the bread to cool a while on a cooling rack before slicing.
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27

A Vegan Galaktoboureko: My Family’s Recipe

Faye's vegan galaktoboureko

Here’s another veganised Greek family recipe I’m very happy to share! Thanks yet again to aquafaba (I use canned chickpea liquid for my aquafaba– please click on that aquafaba link to read more about it!) I was able to recreate this traditional Greek family favourite. I had to experiment a few times because the first time I used the wrong sized baking dish and it turned out flat (but spot on everywhere else). The second time I used ground cinnamon in the syrup (Mum was horrified) as I ran out of sticks and didn’t make enough syrup so it all pooled in the middle and looked urgh. The third time turned out perfect but Mum and I tried the ‘lazy’ way of assembling the filo, but the filo got overcooked on the edges but not in the middle (but again, tasted perfect).

As always with family recipes, people have their own versions. One of my aunts puts cloves in her syrup but my Mum and I don’t. Of course, my version is completely different and not at all traditional as there are no eggs in the egg custard bit! Nor the dairy butter or milk called for. But it tastes pretty much the same and I find it has the same lovely custardy consistency. Plus it’s quite addictive, like the original. My Greek recipe testers agreed that taste-wise you can’t tell the difference between this and the traditional eggs-milk-butter version, so that’s a win for me! The traditional recipe with the butter and eggs is more yellow in colour, so it’s up to you if you want to add a little turmeric, as I’ve done in one example below.

The aquafaba is unbeaten (as in, not whipped) in the custard. I never bothered trying a galaktoboureko simply without egg or using an egg replacer as eggs are a key ingredient for the custard filling 😉  Truthfully, I was not at all sure my custard would hold its shape well when cooled and that it may be either too sloppy or like a dense brick of moosh. I’ve made semolina porridge on the stove enough times (semolina, plant milk and sugar) to know that when it goes cold it’s not nice to eat!

The recipe can be printed out below, but here are some photos of the process and some notes. I will highlight my errors so you don’t repeat them! But if you do, the errors still taste awesome 😀

– Preparing the custard filling of fine semolina, caster (very fine) sugar, seeds from one vanilla pod, cinnamon stick, lemon zest and almond milk. I add everything together then whisk so there are no lumps. Some may prefer to warm the milk first then slowly whisk in the semolina. Whatever works for you, just make sure it’s not lumpy. I’ve tried both ways and it turns out the same:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– The custard has thickened and I’ve removed the cinnamon stick and whisked through the aquafaba. At this point you can add some vegan butter if you like but I don’t even though my mum’s non-vegan recipe calls for butter at this point. Be aware that if you’re using a vegan butter it may slightly influence the final taste (for e.g. if using a coconut oil based butter) though with the amount of lemon, vanilla and cinnamon I use those three flavours stand out the most:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– Preparing the syrup involves boiling then simmering some sugar, water, cinnamon sticks, lemon peel and lemon juice. Can you tell I had no lemon peel left and got desperate? My other experiments involved using a larger strip of peel:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

Get your work space ready! Baking dish, melted vegan butter and your filo pastry. Keep a clean damp towel over your filo until you’re ready to take a sheet. Brush butter on your baking dish first. My baking dish measures about 25cm x 19cm x 8cm:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– Brush butter over the sheet of filo then place it in your buttered baking dish. Depending on the size of your dish, you may have to overlap pieces. Don’t fold the filo to make it fit in the dish, it’s all supposed to hang out. Also don’t worry if your filo tears. Here you can see we’ve overlapped the sheets. I did about six layers:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– The custard should be cooled (or at least ever so slightly warm to the touch, but not hot!) when you pour it in to your prepared dish:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– Use a sharp knife to gently cut through the top layers of filo. Don’t cut through to the bottom! In this photo example, Mum and I folded the ‘lazy’ way, which was adding a few sheets to entirely cover the custard, then we folded the overhanging edges inward. I prefer to trim the edges and tuck them in. You can see how to do that in this video, which is in Greek but fast forward towards the end to see how it’s done. It’s very important to make sure your custard filling is enclosed properly so it doesn’t leak out and make a mess in your oven:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– In this experiment, Mum’s oven browned the filo too much on the edges. Although the filo in the middle was cooked and crisp, we decided it was best to take it out instead of letting the middle brown more. Use your sharp knife to cut pieces all the way through but don’t remove a piece! I prefer to leave it cool before I cut it, but Mum and I were in a hurry here:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– Your syrup should be completely cool before pouring it over the hot galaktoboureko. Here my Mum poured it straight from the saucepan but I recommend using a ladle or a big spoon. At this point Mum and I realised we didn’t use enough filo sheets on top and were a bit mehhhh just pour it straight on and get it over with! Now this is the hard part: LEAVE IT TO COOL! You will be tempted to pick at the filo. You will pick at the filo. You will go find something to do but keep coming back for more picksies. You will cut a weeeeee piece while it is still hot even when you know you should wait. I am certain of it. When it has cooled enough for a piece to hold its shape, without custard slopping around, that’s when you can stuff your face:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– In the next ugly photo below, I tucked the filo in properly around the edges. Then I had a moment of panic where I thought I had made a mistake with cutting through the filo before baking, so I used filo scraps like band-aids and hoped it would end up looking like a pretty decoration. It didn’t. This is also the experiment where I used cinnamon powder in the syrup instead of sticks and I also made half the amount of syrup I needed. Not only has most of the syrup pooled in the middle, but the cinnamon powder has kinda made it look crap. So don’t use cinnamon powder!

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– In the next photo, I’ve tucked the filo in properly but it was too bulky around the edges because I had the batch of filo from hell, where the sheets were clumped together and kept tearing when I’d try to separate them. Still, biting in to a chunk of nice sweet filo doesn’t bother me too much:

Faye's vegan galaktoboureko

– This next pic shows a piece from the batch with the cinnamon-powder-in-syrup-instead-of-sticks. I’d also added a good pinch of turmeric to the custard for colour. Despite how fug this experiment looked (in the photo immediately above), it tasted perfect:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– In this pic below, the slice comes from the same batch shown in the step-by-step photos. We didn’t use enough filo on the top layer. You can see it’s still quite pale on top, even though it was crisp and cooked. The custard is also the untouched colour (as in no turmeric). When the syrup is poured on top your filo will soften. It won’t look as good over the next few days but you won’t care:

Faye's Vegan Galaktoboureko

– This was my final experiment, using six tablespoons of aquafaba instead of four. Hard to say if it made much of a difference, because in this experiment I also added more syrup. The end result was a slightly softer custard, though whether this was because I added more syrup I can’t be sure. So if my recipe says use four tablespoons but you have six and have nothing to do with the last two tablespoons, feel free to throw them in instead of down the sink!

Faye's vegan galaktoboureko

The recipe is quite open to flavour changing. If this too lemony or not lemony enough for you, add less or more! Same with the cinnamon, same with the sugar in the syrup. Add a few cloves to the syrup if you like. Some may be happy adding orange and lemon peel to the syrup. Experiment and enjoy the process!

A Vegan Galaktoboureko: My Family's Recipe
Print Recipe
A traditional galaktoboureko includes eggs in the semolina custard. Here I've used aquafaba (my choice of aquafaba is the liquid from canned chickpeas). Encased in filo then soaked in a lemon cinnamon syrup, this galaktoboureko is every bit as delicious as the non-vegan version, standing up equally in taste and structure.
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time
50 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time
50 minutes
A Vegan Galaktoboureko: My Family's Recipe
Print Recipe
A traditional galaktoboureko includes eggs in the semolina custard. Here I've used aquafaba (my choice of aquafaba is the liquid from canned chickpeas). Encased in filo then soaked in a lemon cinnamon syrup, this galaktoboureko is every bit as delicious as the non-vegan version, standing up equally in taste and structure.
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time
50 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time
50 minutes
Ingredients
Syrup
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Make the syrup first: put the syrup ingredients in a small pot. Bring to a boil then simmer for 10 minutes until slightly thickened. Stir occasionally. The syrup must be completely cooled before pouring over the cooked galaktoboureko, so set it aside while you prepare the filling. The syrup may be prepared well in advance.
  2. Preheat your oven to 180C. Prepare your work surface: melt the half cup of butter and butter your serving dish. My serving dish measures 25cm x 19cm x 8cm. Cover your filo pile with a clean damp towel while you work.
  3. Make the filling: in a medium to large sized saucepan, add the milk, vanilla pod seeds, semolina, caster sugar, grated lemon and the cinnamon stick. Whisk well to combine (you may find the cinnamon stick gets in the way) and cook, constantly stirring, over medium heat. When it reaches a gentle boil, reduce the heat to low and simmer (still stirring) until thickened. Remove from heat and discard the cinnamon stick. If using the 1/3 cup butter option, add it in now and stir through. Still stirring, add in the aquafaba and stir until well combined. The custard should be cooled (a little warm is okay) before pouring it in to the prepared filo. Set your custard aside.
  4. Take a sheet of filo and place it in the baking dish with the edges hanging over the side of your dish (don't fold it in to fit the base-- the filo should be hanging over the edges). Brush it with the melted butter over the base and sides. Depending on the size of your filo sheets and dish, you may need to layer half the dish at a time. Each filo sheet should be brushed with the melted butter after placing in the baking dish. Build up six layers of the filo on the base.
  5. Pour the cooled custard on top of the filo base. Take your overhanging pieces of filo and fold them neatly over the custard filling. Brush again with the melted butter if necessary.
  6. Now, taking one fresh sheet of filo, brush it with the melted butter and lay it on top of the custard, similar to how you lined the base. NOTE: some people prefer to splatter/sprinkle the melted butter instead of brushing it. Let the filo hang over the edges as before, like a big blanket. Repeat for about 6 to 8 sheets of filo. I prefer to brush the top layers with butter before putting them on top of the custard.
  7. The folding bit can be tricky and here I'm giving instructions for the nice neat tucked in filo. With a sharp knife or kitchen scissors, trim the overhanging filo just where it hangs over the edges of your baking dish. Then very gently tuck your filo in to the sides, like you're tucking a blanket between the bed and the wall 🙂 Don't worry if it's not perfect, though you must make sure your custard is trapped by filo so it doesn't escape and overflow. Please see my blog post as it has a link to a video showing how I do it. Brush with butter again, over the sides and tops as this helps the filo to go crispy.
  8. With a sharp knife, lightly cut the layers of filo down the middle lengthwise-- don't cut through to the bottom! You really only want to score the first two or three layers of filo. If you cut all the top layers by accident, don't worry about it. Just make sure you don't cut down to the base. Then make a few long perpendicular cuts, these will form your serving sizes.
  9. With your fingers, sprinkle some water on top. My grandmothers always did this to make the pastry more crisp. I can't say if it works or not but I do it anyway!
  10. Put the galaktoboureko in the oven at 180C for about an hour but check at the 45 minute mark. For the last ten minutes I like to put the dish on the bottom rack of the oven, to get the bottom layers of filo browned. When the top has browned nicely, remove from the oven. Have your cooled syrup ready.
  11. Ladle the syrup gently over the galaktoboureko. For my dish I use about four big ladles, so feel free not to use all the syrup if you're concerned it will be too much. Just make sure you pour syrup on those nice thick edges. If you feel you have to flatten the top of the filo (if it's very puffed) please be careful of the steam!
  12. The hard part: leave it to cool completely! Resist the temptation to cut a piece as the custard will be runnier while it's hot. When it has cooled, cut your serving portions and enjoy! You can sprinkle some cinnamon or icing (confectioner's) sugar on top to make it look nicer if serving to guests.
Recipe Notes

Please note this is just my family's veganised recipe. There are different versions of the non-vegan galaktoboureko including different ingredients, amounts and how the filo is folded.

Feel free to play around with the amounts of ingredients shown!

If it sounds tricky, please don't let it put you off! I would say the trickiest bit is when you have to fold in the filo. Don't stress about it (like I did *cough*)! If you're concerned you've assembled the filo incorrectly, put your baking dish on another tray to catch any potential overflow.

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12

Faye’s Mousse Your Own Adventure Cake

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure vegan aquafaba cake

The only fitting way I can begin this blog post is by telling you all that I am super thrilled to share this recipe. I’m trying hard to keep this short but seriously failing!

This is a cake my Mum started making over forty years ago. It never had a name but we called it Biscuit Cake, because of the sponge finger, or Savoiardi, biscuits. Biscuit Cake was the most special of all cakes and was requested by many cousins. It’s sort of like a tiramisu, with your sponge and cream-like layers, though my Mum’s recipe never had coffee or mascarpone.

When I became vegan, I looked in to veganising Biscuit Cake but it was full on vegan unfriendly– cream, butter, eggs. Not to mention a lack of available vegan Savoiardi! When veganising my family’s old recipes, it’s very important to me that I stick to making them as ‘authentic’ as possible. Using coconut cream for example is not an option for a replication of Biscuit Cake (unless I was deliberately going for a brand new cake), because there was no coconut in the original. Same with the mousse component of the cake. I’ve made other mousses with a tofu base, avocado mousse, all those different kinds of vegan mousse, but none were the *same* kind of mousse that is needed for this family favourite.

In short, if I was to veganise Biscuit Cake, it had to taste, look and feel exactly like the Biscuit Cake I grew up with. No compromises. Biscuit Cake is just too special for poor knockoffs!

I never imagined I could one day create a vegan version of Biscuit Cake, that tastes like the original and has the exact same mousse-ishness. But that day has come! And I can sum it up in one word: aquafaba.

If you haven’t heard of aquafaba, perhaps you’ve heard of vegan meringue being made with the liquid from chickpeas or beans. That’s aquafaba. I pop open a can of chickpeas and use the liquid as an egg replacer. Or you can whip the aquafaba and it ends up like whipped egg white! No more pouring the liquid down the sink!

Please check out the Facebook group called Vegan Meringue- Hits and Misses for some amazing creations (and helpful ‘failures’) to see what people are up to. I love checking to see what people have some up with! Or check out #aquafaba on Instagram or Twitter. The official aquafaba site is at http://aquafaba.com/

So I got to thinking: could I really use aquafaba to make the mousse just right? My gut feeling was no because the success of the cake depends on how the mousse turns out.

Awesome people, I am ecstatic to report that I did it! Boy was it a nervous night, pacing up and down, waiting for the mousse to set. A few hours after putting it in the fridge, I ever so carefully tilted the container of this moussey-cake experiment, fully expecting it to run. IT DIDN’T BUDGE. That’s when my heart skipped a beat (and I mean that).

Then I did what anyone else would have done in my position, even though you’re supposed to let this recipe stay untouched in the fridge overnight. I grabbed a spoon and just went for it.

I made the cake a second time as a recipe test and also to get photos of the process, shown below (the full recipe can be printed out further down). Both times turned out fantastic, even with my minor psyllium husk stuff up the second time!

Out of all the family cakes in my collection, Biscuit Cake has the most sentimental spot in my heart. It wasn’t just the cake itself– it was the experience of helping to make it and the anticipation of eating it. Then the loooong wait until it was ready to be topped with cream the next morning, and then hours after that before it would be eaten at a family event. All the kids hung around for Biscuit Cake!

I’ve decided to name this cake Faye’s Mousse Your Own Adventure Cake because you can change up the flavours. If you want a chocolate cake with peppermint flavoured mousse, go to page 42. If you prefer a coconut cake with lemon mousse, turn to page 86. That kind of thing! I did an experiment with a white chocolate raspberry mousse that turned out great.

I’m so happy I can share this much loved family cake with my children (with no raw egg) and I’m so happy I can share it with all of you! If you make it, I’d love to hear how it went!

RECIPE NOTES

I’ll put my notes and tips here in point form. Please read through them, and the recipe, a few times before attempting to make it! I know this is already so long but the cake can seem a little ‘busy’ (truthfully, I sometimes felt frazzled doing this on my own and having a helping pair of hands is good!)

– Have your cake ready: use your favourite vegan plain sponge (or plain cake) recipe. Bake it in a square or loaf tin. When cool, cut it in slices no less than 1cm. You will need two layers of the cake slices, so experiment first with a serving dish to see what fits best (don’t make the cake slices more than 1.5cm). For this cake and even trifles I have used cake recipes from Bryanna Clarke Grogan and Dreena Burton. Just find a plain vanilla cake for my cake shown here.

– Gather your equipment: a small to medium sized saucepan and wooden spoon for melting the chocolate; a large mixing bowl for folding the melted chocolate mix and beaten aquafaba; electric beaters (or something to whip your aquafaba with); a spatula or something to fold beaten aquafaba whites; a small whisk (or spoon) with a bowl for the psyllium husk mixture; a wide bowl for the warmed milk (you will dip cake slices in this); your serving dish. Have everything ready in place.

– Have your workspace (benches/counters, stove, sink) cleared! If, like me, you have a small kitchen, you will need a fair bit of space to work and a place to dump the dirty dishes.

– This cake is best left in the fridge overnight to set properly (apply any cream topping after it has set and when you’re ready to serve). It still tastes fine days later.

– Depending on the density of your cake slices, you may need to dip briefly, or longer. Don’t worry if it doesn’t turn out perfectly, it still tastes awesome!

– Seriously, if this turns out wrong and the mousse is all sloppy and your cake is too mooshy or dry because you over or under dipped the cake slices, don’t worry! It will still taste great. If it’s too wet, call it a pudding with the word ‘surprise’ in the title. If it’s too dry, have some of your favourite cream. I’ve eaten too-wet and too-dry versions in the past, when my cousins had made the original recipe and got it a little wrong but everyone still ate up. So don’t worry!

The full recipe can be printed out below, but here are some of the steps shown with photos.

* Melting your vegan butter and chocolate gently:

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure vegan aquafaba cake

* The melted chocolate-butter mix with unbeaten aquafaba and ground psyllium husk (whisked in milk) added. Photo note! I actually made a mistake when I was mixing up the psyllium husk (I used way too much before adding to the chocolate as I miscalculated). I was able to compensate luckily! The little bits of psyllium husk you see weren’t noticeable in the finished cake, but my first successful experiment had a much smoother looking chocolate mixture:

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure vegan aquafaba cake

* After having beaten your aquafaba, you fold it together with the cooled chocolate mixture to form the mousse:

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure vegan aquafaba cake

* Dip each cake slice in the warmed milk and put a single layer down in your serving dish:

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure vegan aquafaba cake

* Pour half the mousse mixture over the cake slices, making sure everything is covered. Then make a second layer (again, dipping the cake slices in the warm milk before placing on top of the mousse). Then pour the remaining mousse on top (I was a cake slice short here!):

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure vegan aquafaba cake

* Got any leftover mousse? Eat it!

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure vegan aquafaba cake

* Cover and set in the fridge for at least six hours or overnight:

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure vegan aquafaba cake

* The next day, serve! Here I’ve used some cashew cream on top:

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure vegan aquafaba cake

 

I used home made hazelnut milk in this recipe and added a teaspoon of hazelnut extract to the melted chocolate-butter mix. Some other flavour combinations may include

* coconut cake with white chocolate lemon mousse and coconut cream

* chocolate cake with peppermint mousse

* white chocolate raspberry mousse with lemon cake (I tried this and added pureed and strained berries to a white chocolate-vegan butter combination, then added the aquafaba and psyllium husks. The mousse turned out fine)

* almond-milk dipped cake with almond flavoured mousse

I hope you enjoy a Mousse Your Own Adventure of your own 😀

 

Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure Cake
Print Recipe
A much loved favourite of my family's growing up, this cake uses aquafaba for a delicate vegan mousse layered with cake slices. The cake is refrigerated overnight and you can choose your own adventure by changing up milks, flavour extracts or the flavour of your cake or cream topping.
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 35 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 35 minutes
Faye's Mousse Your Own Adventure Cake
Print Recipe
A much loved favourite of my family's growing up, this cake uses aquafaba for a delicate vegan mousse layered with cake slices. The cake is refrigerated overnight and you can choose your own adventure by changing up milks, flavour extracts or the flavour of your cake or cream topping.
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 35 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 35 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Have your preferred cake, such as a plain vegan sponge, cooled and sliced in to pieces approx. 1cm to 1.5cm thick. You need to end up with two layers of the cake slices in your serving dish. My serving dish is 22cm x 17cm and about 8cm high.
  2. On a low heat, melt your chocolate and butter, frequently stirring. When melted, remove from heat and let it cool for about ten minutes.
  3. While the chocolate mixture cools, beat the 9Tbs of aquafaba in a medium sized bowl. Beat until you have soft peaks, appox. ten minutes (for some people it takes longer). Set aside.
  4. In a bowl, whisk together the 2Tbs of ground psyllium husk with about 3/4 cup of the non-dairy milk. It should be a little runny, not thick and requiring effort to stir. If it's not runny enough, add more non-dairy milk. Whisk until well combined (these must be ground psyllium husks).
  5. Add the 4Tbsp of unbeaten aquafaba to the melted chocolate mixture and whisk to combine. Whisk in the psyllium husk-milk mixture until well combined.
  6. Very gently fold the melted chocolate mixture (which now consists of the chocolate, butter, unbeaten aquafaba and ground psyllium mix) to the beaten aquafaba whites. Fold until mostly combined but don't stir. Also don't worry if it's not completely one colour, but try to get as close as you can. This now forms the mousse.
  7. Dip cake slices in to the warmed non-dairy milk, making one layer in your serving dish. I dipped both sides of the cake for a few seconds each, though this step may ultimately be where you discover if you over or under dipped!
  8. Cover the first layer of cake slices with half of the mousse mixture. Make sure everything is well covered so the first layer is even.
  9. Make a second layer of dipped cake slices on top of the mousse in the dish. Top this second layer of cake with the remaining mousse. If you have too much mousse left for your serving dish, put it in a bowl and enjoy it later!
  10. Cover your serving dish and leave it in the fridge for about six hours or overnight.
  11. Add your choice of topping before serving (or taking it out somewhere) such as cashew cream, whipped coconut cream or whatever you've chosen for this adventure! Or you can go without a 'cream' topping and dust on some icing (confectioner's) sugar, top with sliced strawberries, whatever you please!
Recipe Notes

* I've written this recipe with metric measurements.

* Use some aquafaba you have successfully used previously, so you know it whips properly.

* use GROUND psyllium husks! You might need more or less of the non-dairy milk specified to get the psyllium-milk mix to be runny.

* As my preferred cake is already on the sweeter side, I don't need to add any other sweetener. The sweetness comes mainly from the cake but be mindful of the chocolate you use-- if you use a sweeter chocolate perhaps go for a less sweet cake. I prefer my finished product to be a little sweet, not too sweet.

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